Café Femenino Peru – A Great Coffee Doing Great Things!

Friday, November 14th, 2014

Cafe Femenino Foundation Peru

Kobos Coffee is proud to be offering Café Femenino Peruvian coffee and doing our part to help facilitate the hopes and dreams of women coffee producers. Their beans are specially treated with loving care motivated by a better life for themselves and of their children. Enjoy this smooth cup with a mild yet sweet citrus acidity and a nutty fullness that lingers on the palette.

Every purchased pound of this coffee is donating an additional $0.50 per pound to the Café Femenino Foundation to fund grant requests from the women. Since its inception Kobos has donated many thousands of dollars to the cause and this year has adopted a grant in La Florida Peru to fund $3,300 for a clean water project, www.coffeecan.org for more information.

When you purchase this coffee you will help change the lives of these women and children. Continue reading and learn more about our travels to Peru where Café Femenino started.

Co-owner Brian Dibble made his first trip into Peru in 2004. At this time, Café Femenino was just getting started. A meeting in Chiclayo, a city of just over 600,000 located at the base of the Andes Mountains was scheduled for all the women participating or hoping to learn more about this new concept. Many of these women traveled days to come from their farms to participate. It is rare for coffee farmers to leave home and even more so for the women. The roads are difficult and transportation is minimal.
Over 200 women showed up with seemingly little enthusiasm. Many were very shy and worried about the implications of doing something on their own. The uncertainty of how the men would react was surely in the back of many minds. Life was already hard enough for most of the women to have the men become threatened by this project. Many already oppressed or abused did not need things to be worse. An important part in the creation of Café Femenino was not to exclude the men but rather demonstrate that by improving the woman’s self-image, the family unit can be more fulfilling for everyone.

Two years later Brian went back to Peru for a second meeting and to celebrate the hard work making Café Femenino a success. The feeling in the room had completely turned around! The quiet room full of faces looking at the floor were suddenly smiling, making eye contact and laughing. The transition was amazing. During this time, a small film crew from Canada joined Brian and other coffee roasters on the trip. They traveled for a week staying in their homes while learning more about the project and how it has begun to change their lives. The film “Strong Coffee” was released in 2007, a true testimony of the project’s success.

After visiting Peru and learning about the real changes, Brian decided to be the first and only male on the Café Femenino Foundation Board of Directors in 2008. Every year he helps to plan fund raisers and organize events to fund the grant requests from the women. He appreciates the fact that the board does not assume what their needs may be, but rather the women themselves decide what is best for them. The grants are all funded at the end of each year and Brian helps to decide which can be funded based on the amount raised that year. He’s quoted as saying that it is the most rewarding part of being a Board Member. The grant request he brings up most is the Kitchen Improvement Grant.

Witnessing, first hand, the awful adobe stoves with little to no ventilation, the Kitchen Improvement grant requests gained Brian’s support for funding these improvements. These grants seek to raise the stove so that children don’t fall into the fire and to ventilate the smoke so it is not slowly taking their lives.

All the grant requests received from the women coffee-producers are meaningful. Their annual requests include Uterine Cancer Screenings, Seed Projects, Disaster Relief, Water Projects, Health Training, Micro Lending, Livestock and many more that enhance the lives of women and families in the remote coffee-producing communities in Peru.

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